t_teachers

High School

The Holocaust should be studied a major historic event of the 20th century.  The historical context and the genocidal process are at the heart of Holocaust education for high school students.  Learning about the Holocaust through a chronology of events renders an understanding of the causes that gave rise to the Nazi plan of attempted total destruction of European Jewry. Moreover, learning about the totality of events that gave rise to the Holocaust also engenders an understanding regarding the impacts of discrimination and persecution in the daily lives of Jews in the 1930s and 1940s.  Accordingly, students observe the reactions of victims and witnesses and thus ponder the power of the citizen and the role of the State in protecting human rights.

The MHMC has produced several pedagogical activities adhering to the Quebec Education Program that are suitable for elementary and high school students:

Draw-me the story... of Jews in the Netherlands during the Holocaust



Draw-me the story... of Jews in the Netherlands during the Holocaust
was designed for secondary two students in the History and Citizenship course. Using historical documents as a departure point for inquiry and analysis, students learn about the impact of antisemitism and anti-Jewish measures on the lives of three Montreal Holocaust survivors of Dutch origin. Students then create a graphic novel based on the historical experiences of Jews in the Netherlands during the Holocaust. 

By completing the online pre-reservation form you may borrow the tools from the Centre: 
  • The pedagogical guide
  • A copy of the book, "A Brief History of the Holocaust"
  • A DVD
OR download the some of the contents from our website:

Exploring the Evidence: The Holocaust, Cambodian Genocide and Canadian Intervention,  

Exploring the Evidence:  Holocaust, Cambodian Genocide and Canadian Intervention, was developed for Secondary V students in the Contemporary World course. Students learn about the history of the Holocaust and the Cambodian genocide and use Stanton's 8 stages of genocide to contextualize a comparative analysis, highlighting the differences and similarities of the two events. Additionally, students also learn about the numerous ways that Canadian citizens intervened and responded to these two events. A central component of this educational tool is to provide students with opportunities to reflect on issues of intervention and the protection of human rights.
 

By completing the online pre-reservation form you may borrow the tools from the Centre: 
  • The pedagogical guide
  • A copy of the book, "A Brief History of the Holocaust"
  • A DVD
  • A timeline to display in the classroom 
OR download the some of the contents from our website: